>>Happy Thanksgiving, Expat Stories, and This Is America

Happy Thanksgiving, Expat Stories, and This Is America

Berkshire Publishing’s team is thankful for your friendship and partnership. Together, we are responding to the challenges of our time in history, and working to create a sustainable future. Happy Thanksgiving! 感恩节快乐!

Country roads are vital link to rural folks and provide unique opportunities to view wildlife and plant communities. Let’s be thankful for the natural systems that nurture life. Photo by Carl Kurtz, http://www.carlkurtz.com.

KarenKaren writes:

Every American expat has a story about trying to find a turkey, or pumpkin, or oven (in Asia, ovens are not a standard feature in kitchens). During my twenties I lived in London and the big challenge was convincing people that Thanksgiving was a serious holiday, “on a Thursday?” One year I’d started an MA program that had a lot of Americans and my boyfriend and I had just bought a flat. I loved entertaining and had inherited a huge old-fashioned gas cooker with two ovens, so I invited everyone to Thanksgiving dinner. There was one small problem: the gas hadn’t been connected. When Thanksgiving came and it was time to get the turkey in the oven, the gasman still hadn’t turned up.

Fortunately, one of my publishing friends lived just down Camberwell Grove. We squeezed the massive, American-sized bird into his tiny oven. The grad students turned up with side dishes and many bottles of wine. Since we didn’t have much furniture, everyone sat on the floor drinking wine and playing Trivial Pursuit while the gasman (who turned up in the early evening so maybe my phone calls had got someone’s attention) crawled around tapping floorboards, looking for the line. Every once and a while Alwyn went down the road to check on the turkey, while the game continued and the wine flowed. I think we even gave some to the gasman.

After a couple of hours, the ovens went on, dishes went in, and we went to rescue the turkey, bearing it up the street on bath towels, steaming and emitting, it seemed to me, small puffs of smoke. “At least it didn’t catch on fire,” said someone, looking at its charred top and sides.

That meal, nonetheless, like every Thanksgiving meal that has ever taken place, was delicious and festive and far, far too much food. We’d love to hear your stories of an expat Thanksgiving, too: just leave a comment below. Thanks for your notes and stories, and thanks for your place in our lives!

Happy Thanksgiving,
Karen Christensen
Karen CHRISTENSEN, CEO & Publisher
karen@berkshirepublishing.com
Berkshire Blog: www.berkshirepublishing.com/blog

FREE ebook for Thanksgiving

Berkshire has partnered with Flexpub to offer a free ebook edition of our popular little history of the United States, This Is America: A Short History of the United States. It’s fully optimized for mobile reading, and is on an easy-to-use independent platform. Get your copy via Facebook or Google+ as well as your own email. It’s just one click to register and read on all your devices!

By | 2017-11-22T15:54:21+00:00 November 22nd, 2017|News|2 Comments

About the Author:

Karen Christensen is the CEO of Berkshire Publishing.

2 Comments

  1. Lyn Miller-Lachmann 22 November 2017 at 14:15

    My expat story was the subject of a blog post which has turned out to be a very popular blog post, maybe because of a celebrity who showed up: http://www.lynmillerlachmann.com/thanksgiving-in-lisbon/

  2. Dan Vasey 23 November 2017 at 17:33

    Over the years we’ve had a few, Greer, myself, Natasha and Gregory, all of us home from work or school, relatives visiting. A chill breeze rattled the rafters, and the pleasantly dank smell of fallen leaves was everywhere, .

    Sorry, that’s mostly a lie. Our expat Thanksgivings have been in the Southern hemisphere’s late spring or the tropics. Steamy heat, worse if you try to roast a turkey, pollen making noses run.

    One exception was in Helmsey, Yorkshire. We had no luck finding a turkey, but a local bakery did have turkey and cranberry pies on hand, for whom I wasn’t sure. They comprised a good lunch. For dinner we went to a pub, where yes, they had no turkey, but the owner assured us that the Pilgrims probably had a sheep on hand to share with the native Americans and that to mark the occasion the pub had a lovely shoulder roast, served with bubble and squeak. It all worked out.

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