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Berkshire Bookworld live from London, Beijing, and California

BookworldBerkshire Publishing is delighted to announce the launch of Berkshire Bookworld, a podcast series of interviews with authors around the world, hosted by Berkshire’s CEO Karen Christensen. In the first group of podcasts, available at our website and on iTunes, you’ll hear from Professor Kerry Brown in London about biographical writing, Professor Colin Mackerras in Beijing about classic music and theater, and author Carolyn Phillips in California about the 35 cuisines of China. In addition, you’ll have a chance to hear the late James MacGregor Burns, an eminent presidential historian who worked with us on the Encyclopedia of Leadership, talking about leadership in China.

Soon to come is a recording of a speech made by world historian William H. McNeill in 2009. Bill will be 99 in October and I am certain he’d agree that he is unlikely to take the stage again, but I think he’ll enjoy hearing himself deliver “Leaving Western Civ Behind.” Most Berkshire Bookworld podcasts are newly recorded interviews, but we’re digging into our archives for unique audio content. In one recording that will be available later in June, you’ll hear the voice of a woman born in the nineteenth century: Sophia Mumford, widow of the writer Lewis Mumford.

You’ll find the full list of available podcasts, each a comfortable 20 minutes in length, by clicking here, or subscribe via iTunes.

Revolutionary Leadership and China’s Transformations: 13 June 2016

James MacGregor Burns looks at leadership in China in the time of Mao and more recently, and discusses the leader-follower relationship, a key aspect of transformational leadership, a concept closely associated with him.

Geoengineering, Human Hubris, and a Sustainable Future: 30 May 2016

Jim Fleming discusses speculative technological solutions to climate change, a subject he wrote about in the 10th and final volume of the Berkshire Encyclopedia of Sustainability.

How Many Chinese Cuisines?: 23 May 2016

Carolyn Phillips explains why she divides Chinese food into 35 different styles, instead of the supposedly classic four or eight. Her divisions correspond to dialects – “people eat as they speak” – and provide the organizing principle for her new book, All Under Heaven. 

Biography as the way into Chinese history: 16 May 2016

Kerry Brown talks about the massive and overwhelmingly ambitious Berkshire Dictionary of Chinese Biography – the first work of its kind in over a century.

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