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China threat

After a brief but brilliant visit to BEA in New York yesterday (that brilliancy included the weather, which couldn’t have been better–and how we appreciate the arrival of summertime!), I am off to California for a week. Part of my work is research for our new projects on China, and I have been talking to people about their perceptions of the “China threat.” We have a fine article on this topic ready for our new magazine/catalogue and you’ll be able to read an extract by clicking below. It’s drawn from our global perspectives project, and here too is an article from the Asia Times.

The “China Threat”

By Anthony A. Loh

The “China threat” thesis, circulated in the United States, claims that PRC’s economic growth, population size, increasing military capabilities and political influence, threaten U.S. national security. It assumes that Chinese and American political systems and ideologies are irreconcilable, and accordingly predicts that there will be an eventual confrontation between the two countries. From Beijing’s perspective, the thesis reflects America itself more than the reality of China’s rise: China is not like the United States or the Western powers. To counter what it believes to be an unfair haracterization of China, Beijing has come up with its own “Peaceful Rise” thesis (heping jueqi). According to this view, China does not threaten the United States because it does not have superpower ilitary strength; it does not have a tradition of territorial expansion; and it does not pose a single soldier overseas. Heping jueqi essentially argues that China does not subscribe to or share in
the Western tradition of power politics and hegemonism and therefore could not constitute a threat to the United States.

From the article “China” in Global Perspectives on the United States (2005). Anthony A. Loh is a professor at Vanderbilt University.

By | 2005-06-05T08:48:32+00:00 June 5th, 2005|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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